I Don’t Need Anger Management

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Anger management is training for temper control and is the skill of remaining calm. It has been described as deploying anger successfully.Anger management programs consider anger to be a motivation caused by an identifiable reason which can be logically analyzed and if suitable worked toward.Some popular anger management techniques include relaxation techniques, cognitive restructuring, problem solving and improving communication strategies.

The negative effects of anger have been observed throughout history. Advice for countering seemingly uncontrollable rage has been offered by ancient philosophers, pious men, and modern psychologists. Seneca The Younger (4 BC- 65 AD) advised for pre-emptively guarding against confrontational situations, perspective taking, and not inciting anger in anger-prone individuals.Other philosophers echoed Seneca with Galen recommending seeking out a mentor for aid in anger reduction.In the Middle Ages, saints would serve as both examples of self-control and mediators of anger-induced disputes.Examples of intercession for the common people from the wrath of local rulers abound in hagiographies. The story of St. Francis of Assisi and the metaphorical Wolf of Gubbio is one famous instance.

In modern times, the concept of controlling anger has translated into anger management programs based on the research of psychologists. Classical psychotherapy based anger management interventions originated in the 1970s. Success in treating anxiety with Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions developed by Meichebaum inspired Novaco to modify the stress inoculation training to be suitable for anger management.Stress and anger are sufficiently similar that such a modification was able to create a successful branch of treatment. Both stress and anger are caused by external stimuli, mediated by internal processing, and expressed in either adaptive or maladaptive forms. Meichebaum, and later Novaco, used each aspect of experiencing the relevant emotion as an opportunity for improvement to the patient’s overall wellbeing.